Plotting

UnicodePlots.jl

The heatmap() function in UnicodePlots.jl can use colorschemes. You have to supply the colors as an array of floating-point numbers first:

... colormap = [(x.r, x.g, x.b) for x in ColorSchemes.leonardo.colors]

For example:

heatmap(z::AbstractMatrix; title = "Hot!",
    colormap = [(x.r, x.g, x.b) for x in ColorSchemes.leonardo.colors])

"heatmap"

Plots.jl

Plots.jl supports all colorschemes from ColorSchemes.jl. They can be used as a gradient or as a palette and are passed as a symbol holding their name to cgrad or palette.

This renaissance-looking plot uses the leonardo scheme:

using Plots

x = 1:0.3:20
y = x
f(x, y) = begin
      sin(x) + cos(y)
  end
contour(x, y, f, fill=true, c = :leonardo)

"contour"

(You can use c as a short cut for seriescolor.)

With other plots, use the palette keyword:

using ColorSchemes

plot(Plots.fakedata(100, 20),
      w=4,
      background_color=ColorSchemes.vermeer[1],
      palette=:vermeer)

"palette"

Gadfly

Here's how you can use ColorSchemes in Gadfly:

using Gadfly, ColorSchemes
x = repeat(collect(1:20), inner=[20]);
y = repeat(collect(1:20), outer=[20]);
plot(x=x, y=y,
    color=x+y,
    Geom.rectbin,
    Scale.ContinuousColorScale(p -> get(ColorSchemes.sunset, p)))

"gadfly"

Makie

If you use Makie.jl you can pass the colors in a ColorScheme directly to the colormap keyword.

using Makie, ColorSchemes
N = 20
x = LinRange(-0.3, 1, N)
y = LinRange(-1, 0.5, N)
z = x .* y'
image(x, y, z, colormap = ColorSchemes.picasso.colors)

"makie"

You can display all the colorschemes using Makie by letting the code browse through the colorschemes dictionary:

using Makie, ColorSchemes

h = 0.0
offset = 0.1
scene = Scene()
cam2d!(scene)
plot = map(collect(keys(colorschemes))) do cmap
     global h
     c = to_colormap(colorschemes[cmap].colors)
     cbar = image!(
         scene,
         range(0, stop = 10, length = length(c)),
         range(0, stop = 1, length = length(c)),
         reshape(c, (length(c), 1)),
         show_axis = false
     )[end]
     text!(
         scene,
         string(cmap, ":"),
         position = Point2f0(-0.1, 0.5 + h),
         align = (:right, :center),
         show_axis = false,
         textsize = 0.4
     )
     translate!(cbar, 0, h, 0)
     h -= (1 + offset)
end
scene

"makie all colorschemes"

Winston

If you prefer Winston.jl for plotting, you can use ColorSchemes with imagesc:

using Winston, ColorSchemes
klimt = ColorSchemes.klimt.colors
Winston.colormap(klimt)
Winston.imagesc(reshape(1:10000,100,100))

"winston klimt"

Sometimes you'll want a smoother gradient with more colors. You can use get(scheme, n) to generate a more detailed array of colors, varying n from 0 to 1 by 0.001:

brasstones = ColorSchemes.brass
brasstonesmooth = [get(brasstones, i) for i in 0:0.001:1]
Winston.colormap(brasstonesmooth)
Winston.imagesc(reshape(1:10000,100,100))

"winston brass tones

PyPlot

ColorSchemes can be used with the cmap keyword in PyPlot:

# warning: this crashes your Julia session at the moment (2019-01-24)

using PyPlot, Distributions, ColorSchemes

solar = ColorSchemes.solar.colors

n = 100
x = range(-3, stop=3, length=n)
y = range(-3, stop=3, length=n)

xgrid = repeat(x', n, 1);
ygrid = repeat(y, 1, n);
z = zeros(n, n);

for i in 1:n
    for j in 1:n
        z[i, j] = 2sin(x[i]) * 2cos(y[j])
    end
end

fig = PyPlot.figure("pyplot_surfaceplot",figsize=(10,10))

using3D()
ax = fig[:add_subplot](2, 1, 1, projection = "3d")

ax[:plot_surface](xgrid, ygrid, z, rstride=2,edgecolors="k",
    cstride=2,
    cmap=ColorMap(solar),
    alpha=0.8,
    linewidth=0.25)

"pyplot"